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  1. #1
    Richard230's Avatar
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    Finally some news from Honda. One "urban" electric motorcycle, a couple of scooters and one "fun" model. Nothing sounds too exciting though. And you may have to wait a few years to buy one: https://electrek.co/2021/04/26/honda...ext-few-years/
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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  3. #2
    notacop is offline The original Schwartz Wald Troll
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    I've been wondering about charging stations. On my daily walk I come across several electric cars in the streets and driveways. Most of these folks have the umbilical plugged in for charging. Are the charging devices standard? Are the devices built into the vehicle? How is the infrastructure to be set up if each manufacturer has a different connection?
    Seems to me the industry needs to work these issues out before wholesale moves to electric made by the buying public. Having a normal connection, as in an AC electrical extension, would plug into a standard fitting on the vehicle, 2 wheeled or 4. The vehicle should be ready with a fast charge capacity so the charge time would be more on par with filling a 20 gallon gas tank. Where are the drivers supposed to sit around while their vehicle gets recharged. But then opportunistic vendors , Like fast food places, could fill the need.
    It's a brave new world that will be interesting to see grow as States vote to eliminate petrol powered vehicles.
    International compatibility will need to be worked out to. I know the European power is different from what we use in the US.

  4. #3
    Richard230's Avatar
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    The old 240V L2 charging stations typically have a standard connector, which connects to the vehicle's on board charger equipment. However the DC fast charging systems are not all the same and may have different cables, depending upon the manufacturer. They bypass the on-board AC charger. One thing about DC fast charging systems is that they are all privately owned and tend to be quite expensive for the power delivered. Typically more than you would pay for gasoline to travel the same distance. Sometimes much more.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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  6. #4
    N4HHE's Avatar
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    L1 (120VAC) and L2 (240VAC) “chargers” are nothing more than smart extension cords. GFI, overcurrent protection, plus a signal to the vehicle indicating how much current is permitted. Charging smarts are expected to be handled on the vehicle. But some motorcycles have used offboard chargers much the same as one attaches a battery maintainer to conventional vehicles.

    Tesla uses a proprietary connector in North America because 10 years ago the SAE would not agree to a unified AC/DC connector in time for Tesla to commit to production of the Model S. Tesla wanted AC/DC on the same pins. Ultimately SAE grafted extra DC contacts the existing J1772 AC connector. This us now called CCS, Common Charging Solution.

    Non-EV uses suffer from a common misconception of need for ubiquitous charging sites. To ride near battery max range one needs fast DC chargers. But if you have 265 mile range then 200 miles/day has zero need for charging anywhere but at home. This is exactly what Tesla has done with Superchargers spaced 100-125 miles apart on major transportation routes.
    2016 Yamaha FJR1300A; 2016 Beta 430RS; 2007 BMW F800S; 2009 Husaberg FE450; 2016 Subaru Outback; 2018 F150; 2013 Tesla Model S 85; 1983 Porsche 928S; 9 cats 

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