Rivian R1T electric pickup truck review - BMW S1000RR Riders Forum & Registry



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  1. #1
    Richard230's Avatar
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    Here is a review by Road and Track of the new Rivian R1T electric pickup truck: https://www.roadandtrack.com/reviews...r-is-electric/
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    Richard, pretty expensive neighborhood, you might just as well give the new hummer a look while you at it,,.
    https://www.gmc.com/electric/hummer-ev

    Pretty exciting times for those with deep pockets?

    How much does new Hummer weigh?
    Result for new hummer weight 9046 lbs
    You thought the original Hummer was huge? In its most powerful spec, the new GMC Hummer EV Edition 1 pickup will weigh 9046 lbs, nearly 1000 lbs more than the H1.May 18, 2021

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    I agree that some of the new electric vehicles don't appear to be very practical for the general public and are not priced to create a big rush of vehicle owners to dump their ICE cars and embrace battery power. Who really needs that kind of weight and power, plus you are going to have to get them recharged at a commercial charging station, which is typically not all that cheap unless the government is footing the bill and the recharging is free. Plus, the big vehicles have big batteries which take a long time to recharge if you run them down. So you will be spending hours of your day waiting for the battery pack to be fully charged. Not exactly like taking 5 minutes to refuel a gas tank.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    I wonder how well they stop, & what are the brake parts worth?

    My Bro in law always asks,, "Can you see yourself as a contractor pulling onto a job site with a Cybertruck",, and he is a contractor?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lag View Post
    I wonder how well they stop, & what are the brake parts worth?

    My Bro in law always asks,, "Can you see yourself as a contractor pulling onto a job site with a Cybertruck",, and he is a contractor?
    '
    I don't see most contractors being interested in EV pickup trucks. They are looking for cheap, rugged, proven reliability, and a large carrying capacity. That is not what you get with the Rivian or the Cybertruck.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    It is an impressive pickup. Price tag will be too. When I first saw the headlights several years ago, I really disliked them. They have grown on me.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard230 View Post
    I agree that some of the new electric vehicles don't appear to be very practical for the general public and are not priced to create a big rush of vehicle owners to dump their ICE cars and embrace battery power. Who really needs that kind of weight and power, plus you are going to have to get them recharged at a commercial charging station, which is typically not all that cheap unless the government is footing the bill and the recharging is free. Plus, the big vehicles have big batteries which take a long time to recharge if you run them down. So you will be spending hours of your day waiting for the battery pack to be fully charged. Not exactly like taking 5 minutes to refuel a gas tank.
    Why would they need to charge at commercial chargers vs a home charger? Most EV owners who have a driveway or garage charge at home. A 220 Level 2 charger at home will charge from 20% in several hours for most vehicles.

    I agree the prices on some of these new vehicles are ridiculous - but so are many SUVs. I wonder how some people afford the payment.
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    I think that the manufacturers are following Tesla's lead and introducing the high end, high margin vehicles first and then working there way into the more competitive higher volume segments especially for the big manufactures with plenty of successful ICE models on the market,,. A lot of these vehicles are experimental stage which is another reason why I wouldn't take the plunge,,.
    EV's make sense as a commuter vehicle where you have a designated route that you can plan around, charge it at home or at the office when your carrying out other activities,,. Going out touring with a four by four or Electric Motorcycle and getting stuck at a filling station doesn't work for most people,,. My friends wife drives one of the earlier Tesla S models and he hates it, says its a big drama every time they leave town with it,,.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheMeteor View Post
    Why would they need to charge at commercial chargers vs a home charger? Most EV owners who have a driveway or garage charge at home. A 220 Level 2 charger at home will charge from 20% in several hours for most vehicles.

    I agree the prices on some of these new vehicles are ridiculous - but so are many SUVs. I wonder how some people afford the payment.
    I don't think that 220V, "level 2" chargers are going to cut it with the latest vehicles with really big battery packs. Even 8 hours at 220V isn't going to fully recharge some of these batteries. With level 2 AC you need an on-board charger and those tend to be limited by size and cost. The hot setup now is "level 3" DC charging that dumps the juice directly into the vehicle's battery at very high amperage. But I don't think there are any DC systems available for home installation at this time.

    Note that H-D didn't even bother to provide a Level 2 connector in their LiveWire bike and only provided a 120V on-board charger for slow home charging or a Level 3 DC charging system for recharging at your local H-D dealer while there to pick up the latest Screaming Eagle clothing and accessories.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    notacop is offline The original Schwartz Wald Troll
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    Talked to a Tesla driver a couple months ago. He and his wife had made a quick trip from Yellowstone Park to the LA area. They drove into quick charge facilities and in 15 minutes they were back on the way for another 200 miles.
    Don't forget that Ford is advertising it's electric truck as a work site vehicle that can conveniently power your home when the grid in Texas goes down again.
    Might want to consider that most job sites have power and the truck can recharge on site.
    I wonder how many miles the average delivery driver covers in the typical day? A 200 miles range just may provide the power needed.

    A home I walk past on my daily walk has Teslas parked on the street. Someone carelessly smacked into the left rear of one of the Teslas. I've heard that they electric cars are heavier than gas powered vehicles due to the battery mass. The Tesla had a broken tail light and the air bags had been deployed so it must have been a solid whack. I wonder what the other car looked like?

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    A home I walk past on my daily walk has Teslas parked on the street. Someone carelessly smacked into the left rear of one of the Teslas. I've heard that they electric cars are heavier than gas powered vehicles due to the battery mass. The Tesla had a broken tail light and the air bags had been deployed so it must have been a solid whack. I wonder what the other car looked like?

    One of the earlier knocks on Tesla was the body repair bills were horrendous as parts weren't available to the auto body industry and the dealer network didn't have the facilities to repair body work so right offs were common,,. This may have been rectified by now, Tesla's a pretty fast moving company?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard230 View Post
    I don't think that 220V, "level 2" chargers are going to cut it with the latest vehicles with really big battery packs. Even 8 hours at 220V isn't going to fully recharge some of these batteries. With level 2 AC you need an on-board charger and those tend to be limited by size and cost. The hot setup now is "level 3" DC charging that dumps the juice directly into the vehicle's battery at very high amperage. But I don't think there are any DC systems available for home installation at this time.

    Note that H-D didn't even bother to provide a Level 2 connector in their LiveWire bike and only provided a 120V on-board charger for slow home charging or a Level 3 DC charging system for recharging at your local H-D dealer while there to pick up the latest Screaming Eagle clothing and accessories.
    The large commercial trucks will require DC fast charge. Many I read about intend a mix of Level 3 and Level 2 for their fleets. For consumer vehicles, Level 2 is fine unless on a road trip where you want to charge and go. Last week, I drove from my home to Hartford, CT. When I got home, I was at 33% charge and it took about 3.5 hours to get to 75% (where I usually charge to unless going on a road trip) on my home Level 2 charge.

    I was anxious about road trips at first, but we have travelled to Baltimore, Springfield, MA, Buffalo and Hartford in the last six months. The best test was Buffalo as I have family there and done the trip in my previous ICE vehicles too many times to count. It is a 6.5 to 7 hours trip and 360-380 miles. It only took about 20 mins longer in the EV. I did two stops like before. One for a bathroom break and road food. And a second for coffee and a bathroom break. Before, I would need to stop for a gas fillup too. Now, it involves a charging. The food and charge took no more time than food and gas in the past. By the time we hit the bathroom, got our food and ate - I was fully charged. Arguably it was faster because I not need to go get gas. Though, to be fair, in the past ICE trips I may have eaten while driving. Second stop took maybe an extra 20 minutes.

    Of course, the location of charging dictates where you eat and pee. And you need to charge at your destination, but overall it has not been as big an impact as I expected nor restricted my travel. I acknowledge other parts of the country may not have as robust a charging network.

    Also, in my area EVs are suddenly everywhere in the last 12-18 months. When I go to WNY or visit my son in Central PA, they are still a bit of a rarity.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard230 View Post
    I don't think that 220V, "level 2" chargers are going to cut it with the latest vehicles with really big battery packs. Even 8 hours at 220V isn't going to fully recharge some of these batteries. With level 2 AC you need an on-board charger and those tend to be limited by size and cost. The hot setup now is "level 3" DC charging that dumps the juice directly into the vehicle's battery at very high amperage. But I don't think there are any DC systems available for home installation at this time.
    You have Zero(s) but no EV car?

    We don't routinely "fully charge" EV cars, we have more than enough range to get around for the day then "top off" to 75 or 80% at night. Repeat. We do not drive until empty then stop for gas.

    Modest homes around here have 200A service. 240V on 50A circuit is 40A 100% duty cycle, 9600W. A 135 kWh battery depleted to 20% will charge to 80% in about 10 hours at 9.6kW. Why do you think that is unacceptable? The worst of it is that it is longer than the cheap time for those with T.O.U. billing.
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  20. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by N4HHE View Post
    You have Zero(s) but no EV car?

    We don't routinely "fully charge" EV cars, we have more than enough range to get around for the day then "top off" to 75 or 80% at night. Repeat. We do not drive until empty then stop for gas.

    Modest homes around here have 200A service. 240V on 50A circuit is 40A 100% duty cycle, 9600W. A 135 kWh battery depleted to 20% will charge to 80% in about 10 hours at 9.6kW. Why do you think that is unacceptable? The worst of it is that it is longer than the cheap time for those with T.O.U. billing.

    I only drive my ICE car a few hundred miles a year so an EV car wouldn't pencil-out for me. When the houses in my area were built 50 years ago most of the homes were built with 120V power (with direct-burial wire service) and gas for everything else. I am not sure what amperage my service is, but all of the circuit breakers in my electrical box are marked 20 amps (and I have yet to see an electrical outlet with a grounding wire). Most of my power needs are supplied by natural gas, such as my stove, furnace, water heater, clothes dryer (maybe my lights, too ) Since all of the electrical distribution and services around here are underground, the cost of upgrading to 240V would be pretty high, likely at least several thousand dollars - and that assumes that you could even find an electrician that wasn't booked up with jobs for years.

    When I made my comment about L2 charging being unacceptable I was thinking of commercial vehicles that have large batteries and either drive long distances each day or carry heavy loads. Or recreational vehicles like the Rivian whose owners might want to be use the vehicle to travel hundreds of miles to a recreational area and/or used to pull a trailer or boat. They are used a lot for those purposes on the weekends around here. Trailers have been selling really well lately as people struggle to find things to buy with the money that has been flowing in to their households ever since the pandemic started and they haven't had to go into work like they used to do.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    Some pretty hot looking designs coming down the pipe, seem like the leading edge is being directed to EV, like Etrons, Tycans, Ipace, even Cadillac,,!!

    I just don't know, I get impatient when I have to fill my vehicles up with gas which isn't very often with how much I drive,,. Sometime I wonder why I choose a station with such a slow pump so I think for me a road trip it would be aggravating to alter my plan based on fuel even though its obviously quite doable,,. Also if you stay at friends while on vacation you need to mooch electricity which is something you would never do with gas as its so readily available?

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    My 200A power is direct burial. 4 houses are served from the same tap on the transformer. Hard to believe you have only 120v service. You have air conditioning? My HVAC for 1500 sq ft is on a 70A circuit.

    As for the service size, what is the top breaker in your distribution panel? The one that turns everything off. Does it have 2 bars? If so: 240V.

    You would be surprised at how easy it is to change direct burial wire and pipes. They tie the new to the old and use a tractor or backhoe to pull on old drawing the new through.

    If what you say is true then you are in the bottom 1% of American homes.
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    Having access to only 120V service would be a deal breaker for everyday usage for me. I have read folks that live in apartments/condos with no options to charge at home or those that have only street parking and make it work via public chargers. For me, that would be too big a tradeoff and lifestyle change.

    At my home, I installed a Level 2 charger outside my garage. Much to my wife's chagrin, the bikes own the inside. My electrician ran a 60 amp line from my basement power panel to my garage which, IIRC, cost about $500-600 plus permits.
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    Quote Originally Posted by N4HHE View Post
    My 200A power is direct burial. 4 houses are served from the same tap on the transformer. Hard to believe you have only 120v service. You have air conditioning? My HVAC for 1500 sq ft is on a 70A circuit.

    As for the service size, what is the top breaker in your distribution panel? The one that turns everything off. Does it have 2 bars? If so: 240V.

    You would be surprised at how easy it is to change direct burial wire and pipes. They tie the new to the old and use a tractor or backhoe to pull on old drawing the new through.

    If what you say is true then you are in the bottom 1% of American homes.

    No one that I know of has air conditioning in my area. If you want your home cooled off, you just need to open up your windows.

    I took a close look at my electrical panel for the first time. It has a large number of red circuit breakers marked 20 amps and one blue 15 amp breaker for the furnace. In the middle of the panel are two grey breakers attached to each other. They are marked 100 amps. So I assume that the panel would not need to be changed if the electrical wiring in my home was upgraded. The adjacent "smart meter" (which is read electronically and no longer by a utility employee) belongs to the electrical service provider, Pacific, Graft and Explosion. So I assume that any upgrade to my home's electrical service could be performed by a private electrician and only require a city $$$ permit and inspection. (To give you an idea how expensive city permits are, 20 years ago when I had a contractor place a 3" cast iron pipe through the street curb so that it drained into the gutter, the contractor charged me $100 to bore a hole through the curb and the city charged me $400 for the permit authorizing the hole and to perform an inspection of the work. )

    I just received my electrical power bill yesterday. For the month I used 168 kWh at a cost of 26 cents per kWh. So that would make my average daily electrical power consumption 5.6 kWh.

    When I had a foundation drain installed next to the foundation wall along that side of the house (the old foundation drain consisted of a 3" clay pipe with its joints open, but it wasn't connected to any outlet, which resulted in flooding of my downstairs bedroom and garage) the electrical service was exposed and I was surprised to see the wire looking more like an extension cord than something more durable.

    I am not sure how many homes around here actually have 240V circuits past the meter as during my walks I see several Model 3 Teslas sitting in driveways with L1 cords and not L2 handles connected to their power receptacles. I suspect that it would not be to big a project to upgrade to 240V power inside the home, just something of an expensive hassle.
    Richard - Current bikes: 2016 BMW R1200RS, 2018 16.6 kWh Zero S, 2011 Royal Enfield Bullet 500 Classic, 2009 BMW F650GS, 2020 KTM 390 Duke, 2002 Yamaha FZ1 (FZS1000N) and a 1978 Honda Kick 'N Go Senior. 

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard230 View Post
    No one that I know of has air conditioning in my area. If you want your home cooled off, you just need to open up your windows.

    I took a close look at my electrical panel for the first time. It has a large number of red circuit breakers marked 20 amps and one blue 15 amp breaker for the furnace. In the middle of the panel are two grey breakers attached to each other. They are marked 100 amps. So I assume that the panel would not need to be changed if the electrical wiring in my home was upgraded.
    Most likely you have a 100A rated panel. But the part about "two attached to each other" shouts 240V. One is on each side of the 240V. Half your 120V circuits are on one side, half on the other, and if either exceeds 100A then both sides get shut down by the bar spanning the two 100A.

    When I had a foundation drain installed next to the foundation wall along that side of the house (the old foundation drain consisted of a 3" clay pipe with its joints open, but it wasn't connected to any outlet, which resulted in flooding of my downstairs bedroom and garage) the electrical service was exposed and I was surprised to see the wire looking more like an extension cord than something more durable.
    It should be at least 2 AWG for 100A, the romex bundle will be at least 1" in diameter.

    I am not sure how many homes around here actually have 240V circuits past the meter as during my walks I see several Model 3 Teslas sitting in driveways with L1 cords and not L2 handles connected to their power receptacles. I suspect that it would not be to big a project to upgrade to 240V power inside the home, just something of an expensive hassle.
    Am pretty sure you have 240V. Is possible both sides of your distribution panel are connected to the same "leg" but that concept boggles the mind.

    At the moment I can't think of an easy way to test for 240V without a volt meter and/or removing the cover to your distribution panel. But living in a police state you probably have to have a permit from the city to reset a tripped breaker.

    Tesla uses exactly the same EVSE for L1 as L2. There is no "L2 handle". There are two Tesla EVSEs, the Mobile Connector (MC) and the Wall Connector (WC, previously known as the High Power Wall Connector, HPWC). Both function L1 or L2. The primary difference is the WC has a heavier cable rated for 80A continuous. The plug at the vehicle is the same.

    The MC has several plug adapter options at the wall end. Tesla uses a proprietary intermediary connector for the adapter so as to know if the NEMA5-15 (therefore 15A circuit) is attached or NEMA14-50 (50A circuit) to tell the vehicle of the current limits. Tesla also offers another NEMA I forget, but common for dryer connections.
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    A bit tangential but just read this in my Aerostich email this evening. Some thoughts on the air of change.

    https://www.aerostich.com/blog/turning-points/
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    '19 Tracer GT
    I bought a new Chevy Bolt in January because it was cheap. $21,322 out the door including taxes, no trade and no government assistance. We d have a GM card which saved us $3,400 plus and extra $3,000 bonus earnings. In February the bonus earnings went away but could get an extra $3,000 off thru Costco. Car sticker'd at $44,130. I guess Chevy was making it's profits on volume haha. I had a Volt before and it was a fantastic car. I thought at the time there would not be another opportunity to buy a Bolt or another EV at anywhere near the price and so far have been correct. I've been able to sell it to Carmax and make a few thousand but what could I buy? At the time it was less expensive than a Honda CRV. It drives nicely, is a bit sporty and I leave home every day with a "full tank". Due to the lack of charging stations in NE Alabama it is just a city car although I have DC fast charge capability. Driving an EV is similar to a normal car but different. Smooth and quiet without having to have elaborate sound deadening systems and moron mounts. Just press the accelerator and it goes, no shifting just goes. With regen slowing becomes something of a game as I routinely drive even coming to complete stops without touching the brake pedal. Maintenance? Simply put there is none other than occasionally checking the washer fluid.

    For charging I charge at 12A 120 or 240V and never have a problem with not having enough range. If more people understood the good parts of having an EV there would be more drivers. Right now the big missing piece is charging infrastructure. Tesla has lots of charging station around but other no so much. I would have liked to have driven it to Chattanooga recently but there are not good reliable convenient charging stations I could use. Would have to go out of my way, use a much slower charger or hope the one that is available is not broken or in use. I have a gasoline powered van for trips. For really long trips I have my motorcycle The mention of the Tesla that drove from Yellowstone to LA failed to mention that routes available are dependent on the availability of charging stations. When riding in remote areas in Wyoming and Montana I have enough trouble finding gasoline much less a DC fast charger or even a Level 2 (slower) charger. From what I have seen the DCFC are mostly along major routes and not on the remote secondary roads the I like to take when on a sightseeing trip.

    Didn't buy my Bolt to save the planet, bought it because it was good reliable and low cost transportation for trips to Costco, the grocery store and taking my grandkids for ice cream. The Rivian appears to be a great off-road vehicle at a reasonable price. However I cannot get over the look of the front, just is not appealing. Tesla hit a home run with the Model S and used it to build their image. The styling of most of th EVs out there do not appeal to me at all and that includes the 2022 Bolt. Most folks that see my Bolt think it is a small car or SUV and don't realize its an EV.

    @Richard230 I know what you mean about older houses. Mine was built in the early to mid 60s and when we bought it 30 years ago we had the fuse panel replaced with a breaker panel. My son lives in San Jose and I've seen the older houses there. It is going to be interesting with more EVs as people start to try to connect chargers to old electrical wiring. I'll be out there in 3 weeks to visit my son.

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